Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Treewhispers’

Connection

Thanks Jamie Thome for sharing this incredible must read from the NY Times!

Read Full Post »

Forest of Honey

This tree is done in the Madhubani style of Indian art, practiced in the Mithila region of the Indian subcontinent, which includes the states of Bihar and Jharkhand, extending into Nepal. Madhubani art was largely practiced by women artists, characterized by geometric patterns and religious motifs, and is soaked in mythology and antiquity. Trees and nature are a part of most art from Madhubani, which celebrates nature. It’s very name means ‘forest of honey’.

In Madhubani art, the figures are two-dimensional in nature. The features usually include sharp noses with bulging eyes. Double lines are used to draw figures, flora and fauna. Also, the designs are filled with intricate lines and no shading is required. Typically, no empty spaces are left in this style and are usually filled with leaves and flowers. Where there are fine lines used for shading, it’s called Kachni, meaning ‘to cut’. Here color is not applied. Where there are open forms, and color is applied is called Bharni meaning ‘to fill’. 

Madhubani is still practiced and kept alive in institutions spread across the Mithila region and beyond.

For my interpretation of the tree, I used fineline markers for the black outlines and colored brush pens for the colors. I kept to the rule of Kachni and Bharni, to stay true to the Madhubani style of art.

Nita Padamsee, Massachusetts

Read Full Post »

Hangin’ out

Photo by Pamela Paulsrud

Read Full Post »

Incomparable joy

Artwork by Elizabeth McKee, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Read Full Post »

Hanging in the “heart space”

Photo by Lindsey Pennecke

Read Full Post »

Artwork by Angela Michielutti

Poetry by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Read Full Post »

Lingering

Photo by Pamela Paulsrud

Read Full Post »

Every year I anticipate the bark shedding from my 5 crepe myrtle trees. It’s rich in texture and color and I enjoy looking at it. 


When I picked up the bark, however, I felt sad about the current state in California, where again, the forests have burned, out of control, 3.5 million acres, the worst in the state’s history. 

Even though many trees can regrow, I felt empathy for their forced plight. I photographed the bark pieces and wrote a haiku verse with the 5-7-5 syllables: 


“Bark, once shed with grace

Now destroyed by fire’s blaze.

Rise again, beauties!”

Phawnda Moore Rocklin, CA

Read Full Post »

Photos by Pamela Paulsrud

Driving through the Logan Square neighborhood in Chicago I came across these incredible sculptures—then learned about this citywide project honoring dead and dying trees.

Press Release

CHICAGO TREE PROJECT 2018: SCULPTORS GIVE NEW LIFE TO DEAD AND DYING TREES THROUGHOUT CHICAGO PARKS

CHICAGO—Chicago Sculpture International (CSI), in conjunction with the Chicago Park District (CPD), is proud to announce the “Chicago Tree Project 2018,” an annual citywide effort to transform sick and dying trees into vibrant public art. Using art as a vessel for public engagement, sculptors will transform a variety of trees into fun and whimsical experiences for the greater Chicago community. The collaborative project between CSI artists and CPD and is part of the greater initiative to expand the reach of public art in Chicago.

“The Chicago Park District strives to integrate art and nature in many ways to enhance the experience of public spaces,” said General Superintendent and Chief Executive Officer of the Chicago Park District Michael P. Kelly. “This project builds on the city’s reputation for great public art, and brings the work of local sculptors to a wide array of neighborhoods throughout the city.”

Over the course of the Summer and continuing into the Fall, artists have adopted trees throughout Chicago and will modify them through sculpture. With traditional carving methods, as well as mixed media and other embellishments, each tree will receive a new life as a centerpiece designed to encourage dialogue and enrich the surrounding park. The chosen trees are in geographically diverse areas to give as many residents as possible access to the pieces.

The tree project was originally proposed and organized by Chicago Sculpture International, a group of artists devoted to the understanding and creation of sculpture as a unique and vital contribution to society. The project will be completed by the end of November, and the decorated and carved trees will remain in the parks as long as the trees remain secure.

 

http://www.chicagotreeproject.org/

Read Full Post »

Jenn_Walt

Artwork by Jenn Waltemath, Omaha, NE

Read Full Post »

Someone

Reading

Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago. Warren Buffett 

 

Photo by Pamela Paulsrud

Read Full Post »

SOLD

Sold

Photo by Pamela Paulsrud

Read Full Post »

Reflections

IMG_9113.jpg

Photo by Pamela Paulsrud

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_125825~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_125120~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_114921~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_114742~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_114618~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_114345~2

Read Full Post »

MVIMG_20171128_114232~2

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »